CU celebrates an Aggie Arbor Day

Planting for a purpose: (Left to right) Samantha Ristedt, Seth Geiger, Alexander Franco and Dalton Matthews finish planting the Coffeetree for Arbor Day. The event took place on April 17.

Planting for a purpose: (Left to right) Samantha Ristedt, Seth Geiger, Alexander Franco and Dalton
Matthews finish planting the Coffeetree for Arbor Day. The event took place on April 17.

Kali Robinson

Staff Photographer 

CU Provost John McArthur spoke on Arbor Day east of the CETES building as students volunteered to plant two new trees at noon on April 17.

Sophomore Biology major Alexander Franco, junior Criminal Justice major Dalton Matthews and senior Chemistry major Samantha Ristedt helped plant a Kentucky Coffeetree for Arbor Day.

Provost McArthur began the event with a brief welcome. He then mentioned the most recent American tragedy at Boston, emphasizing the idea that it was an opportune time for planting.

“Tree [planting] plays a role in memories,” he said.

A number of trees, according to Provost McArthur, had been planted around the CU campus in honor of late students and exceptional graduates. Several trees had been chosen to be a part of the Cameron Tree Tour because of their economic aesthetic or ethno botanical properties.

William Schlecht, CU’s first Biology Education graduate, who has supported Cameron University Plan 2013 by promoting an active campus lifestyle and improving the overall quality of student life, planned the project.

Provost McArthur recognized other individuals who helped make Arbor Day at CU possible as well.

“Regent John Stuart [is] one of Cameron’s regents who has contributed over $100,000 to plant trees throughout campus and around the perimeter of campus,” Provost McArthur said.

The Kentucky Coffeetree was the first of the two trees that were planted by students. According to the Arbor Day Foundation, they tolerate most conditions and withstand drought and pollution.

“The Coffeetree is a simulation of a coffee bean you will not find at Starbucks,” Provost McArthur said.

The second tree planted was the Caddo Maple tree, whose name is derived from the Caddo Canyon is western Oklahoma, is also capable of adapting to different types of conditions. According to Provost McArthur, the tolerance of these trees was vital for the place in which they were planted.

“This is the furthest western extent for maples in the United States,” he said. “It’s supposed to do well in our soil and climate conditions, the real challenge in this area.”

Provost McArthur brought the event to a close by quoting “Trees” by Joyce Kilmer.

“I think I shall never see a poem as lovely as a tree,” he said.

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