Romney continues lead in Republican Primaries

 

by Colin DuRant

Candidates for the Republican Party presidential nomination continue their primary campaigning as each week brings them nearer to the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, on Aug. 27. Four candidates remain in the race: Mitt Romney, former Governor of Massachusetts, Rick Santorum, former Senator from Pennsylvania, Newt Gingrich, former Representative and Speaker of the House from Georgia, and Ron Paul, current Representative from Texas.

According to the Associated Press, Romney possesses a lead of 568 pledged delegates to Santorum’s 273, Gingrich’s 135 and Paul’s 50. To secure the nomination, a candidate must receive 1,144 delegates. As of press time there are 22 states with primary elections remaining, Maryland and Wisconsin being the next two on April 3. 1,258 delegates are left for the candidates to secure.

Campaign rhetoric from both Romney and Santorum camps has intensified as Romney’s lead increased with a March 18 primary win in Puerto Rico and another win on March 20 in Illinois. Santorum has managed to stay in the race though, securing the Louisiana victory and 10 delegates on March 24.

Despite the large delegate difference, Santorum has not shown any indication of dropping out of the race, and was quoted in the Washington Post defending his candidacy against those who say his chances of securing the nomination are mathematically slim.

“Our math is actually based on reality of what’s going on in the states as opposed to this fuzzy idea that it’s going to be apportioned based upon what the votes are in the states,” Santorum said.

At a campaign stop in Wisconsin on March 25, media outlets quoted Santorum criticizing Romney on his ability to campaign against “Obamacare”, due to Romney’s history with a similar healthcare system Romney implemented while Governor of Massachusetts.

“Pick any other Republican in the country,” Santorum said. “He is the worst Republican in the country to put against Barack Obama.”

Santorum later defended his statements as being specifically targeted towards Romney’s healthcare record.

On March 26, the candidate spoke out in response to pressure from a New York Times reporter on the issue.

Santorum said: “Quit distorting my words. It’s bullshit.”

Santorum’s campaign later released a statement on the outburst.

“Earlier today, while campaigning in Wisconsin, I criticized Romney and Obama for their outrageous healthcare legislation,” the letter read. “Predictably, I was aggressively attacked by a New York Times reporter all too ready to defend the two of them, and all too ready to distort my words. Let me assure you, I didn’t back down, and I didn’t let him bully me.”

Romney’s campaign team has been quick to capitalize on Santorum’s attacks. In a statement to the Associated Press, Romney spokesman Ryan Williams said Santorum’s remarks were becoming “increasingly shrill” as his hopes of election slid away.

Romney has come under attack from many conservatives as well after his campaign strategist Eric Fehrnstrom spoke about the changing nature of the election during a CNN appearance on March 21.

“Everything changes. It’s almost like an Etch A Sketch,” Fehrnstrom said. “You can shake it up and restart all over again.”

Opponents capitalized on the remark, with both Santorum and Gingrich bringing an Etch A Sketch to campaign events. Etch A Sketch manufacturers Ohio Art Company reported an increase of sales and stock prince in an interview Bloomberg.

Meanwhile, Romney’s campaign has in many ways already shifted focus towards the fall election. Romney was quick to criticize President Barack Obama’s “hot mic” remarks at a meeting with Russian President Dmitri Medvedev in South Korea regarding U.S. missile defense capabilities.

ABC News quoted the President’s comments.

“This is my last election,” President Obama said. “After my election I have more flexibility.”

The Washington Post quoted Romney’s quick condemnation of the remark.

“President Obama signaled that he’s going to cave to Russia on missile defense,” Romney said, “but the American people have a right to know where else he plans to be flexible in a second term.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by Colin DuRant

Candidates for the Republican Party presidential nomination continue their primary campaigning as each week brings them nearer to the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, on Aug. 27. Four candidates remain in the race: Mitt Romney, former Governor of Massachusetts, Rick Santorum, former Senator from Pennsylvania, Newt Gingrich, former Representative and Speaker of the House from Georgia, and Ron Paul, current Representative from Texas.

According to the Associated Press, Romney possesses a lead of 568 pledged delegates to Santorum’s 273, Gingrich’s 135 and Paul’s 50. To secure the nomination, a candidate must receive 1,144 delegates. As of press time there are 22 states with primary elections remaining, Maryland and Wisconsin being the next two on April 3. 1,258 delegates are left for the candidates to secure.

Campaign rhetoric from both Romney and Santorum camps has intensified as Romney’s lead increased with a March 18 primary win in Puerto Rico and another win on March 20 in Illinois. Santorum has managed to stay in the race though, securing the Louisiana victory and 10 delegates on March 24.

Despite the large delegate difference, Santorum has not shown any indication of dropping out of the race, and was quoted in the Washington Post defending his candidacy against those who say his chances of securing the nomination are mathematically slim.

“Our math is actually based on reality of what’s going on in the states as opposed to this fuzzy idea that it’s going to be apportioned based upon what the votes are in the states,” Santorum said.

At a campaign stop in Wisconsin on March 25, media outlets quoted Santorum criticizing Romney on his ability to campaign against “Obamacare”, due to Romney’s history with a similar healthcare system Romney implemented while Governor of Massachusetts.

“Pick any other Republican in the country,” Santorum said. “He is the worst Republican in the country to put against Barack Obama.”

Santorum later defended his statements as being specifically targeted towards Romney’s healthcare record.

On March 26, the candidate spoke out in response to pressure from a New York Times reporter on the issue.

Santorum said: “Quit distorting my words. It’s bullshit.”

Santorum’s campaign later released a statement on the outburst.

“Earlier today, while campaigning in Wisconsin, I criticized Romney and Obama for their outrageous healthcare legislation,” the letter read. “Predictably, I was aggressively attacked by a New York Times reporter all too ready to defend the two of them, and all too ready to distort my words. Let me assure you, I didn’t back down, and I didn’t let him bully me.”

Romney’s campaign team has been quick to capitalize on Santorum’s attacks. In a statement to the Associated Press, Romney spokesman Ryan Williams said Santorum’s remarks were becoming “increasingly shrill” as his hopes of election slid away.

Romney has come under attack from many conservatives as well after his campaign strategist Eric Fehrnstrom spoke about the changing nature of the election during a CNN appearance on March 21.

“Everything changes. It’s almost like an Etch A Sketch,” Fehrnstrom said. “You can shake it up and restart all over again.”

Opponents capitalized on the remark, with both Santorum and Gingrich bringing an Etch A Sketch to campaign events. Etch A Sketch manufacturers Ohio Art Company reported an increase of sales and stock prince in an interview Bloomberg.

Meanwhile, Romney’s campaign has in many ways already shifted focus towards the fall election. Romney was quick to criticize President Barack Obama’s “hot mic” remarks at a meeting with Russian President Dmitri Medvedev in South Korea regarding U.S. missile defense capabilities.

ABC News quoted the President’s comments.

“This is my last election,” President Obama said. “After my election I have more flexibility.”

The Washington Post quoted Romney’s quick condemnation of the remark.

“President Obama signaled that he’s going to cave to Russia on missile defense,” Romney said, “but the American people have a right to know where else he plans to be flexible in a second term.”

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