Argyros Integrates Research into New Book

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Vicky Smith
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@pinkwritinglady

Dr. Ioannis Argyros, professor of mathematical sciences, authored his latest book “Intelligent Numerical Methods: Applications to Fractional Calculus” this year.
Argyros has published 26 books and over 850 peer reviewed articles over his career and has been a faculty member of Cameron since 1990.
Dr. George Anastassiou from the University of Memphis co-authored the book, and Cameron student Akinola Akinlawon conducted research alongside Argyros.
Argyros said the book took about three years to complete and is designed to assist senior undergraduate students, graduate students, researchers and practitioners in their studies.
“This book belongs in the area of applied mathematics,” Argyros said. “A lot of phenomena has been described using an equation, and you have to solve the equation to answer to the physical phenomenon, … so we develop methods to solve those equations.”
The methods presented can be used to solve real-life problems encountered in biosciences, engineering, mathematical programming, convex optimization, mathematical physics and mathematical economics.
Senior computer science major Akinlawon said he assisted Argyros with research on polynomials.
“It was a truly rewarding experience for me,” he said. “I was more than excited to showcase our findings on a poster for Oklahoma Research Day, as well as the CU Academic Summit in 2015.”
At Oklahoma Research Day 2015, Akinlawon presented the project “Roots of Polynomials and their Applications.”
“It showed a very interesting discovery about how the famous Newton-Kantorovich condition for solving equations can always be replaced by a weaker one,” he said. “Every part of a math textbook is important because a careful and complete understanding of one topic is always a requirement to understand another. This truth about mathematics has always fascinated me.”
Akinlawon said doing undergraduate research with Argyros is one of the core highlights of his story at Cameron.
“I recommend undergraduate research not just for anyone willing to step forward into graduate school,” he said, “but also for anyone who is willing to make the extra effort in whatever field of study.”
According to Akinlawon, Argyros not only taught him how conduct research in mathematics but also how to better apply himself.
“Research with Dr. Argyros has taught me many things over and beyond the world of mathematics,” he said. “His mentorship has definitely trained me to improve on my work ethic.”
Argyros has been working since the age of seven. He said his parents are the ones who taught him the importance of a good work ethic.
“My parents were very hard working,” he said. “My father was in the Greek resistance against the Germans. He was a middle school kid, and at that same time, they closed the schools in Greece.
“He finished third grade and then he became a butcher. … I did not want to work at the butchery because it was a very difficult job, but my character was built there because from seven years old, I was working there.”
Instead of pursuing a career in butchery, Argyros gained inspiration from his middle school math teachers in Greece to pursue mathematical studies.
“I had very, very good teachers,” he said. “They were doing their job right, and they motivated me to move in that area. … In math, you find honesty. I admire it very much.”
Likewise, Akinlawon has a passion for math because he values its consistency and simplicity.
“Know the rules, apply them properly, and you would always reach an answer,” he said.
“Solving or proving something mathematically always brings an inexplicable satisfaction to the student and the teacher alike no matter how many times you do it.”
Argyros’ passion for math has enabled him to succeed academically. He has shared his research at conferences in many countries, including Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, England, Scotland, Romania, Greece, Cyprus, Switzerland, Spain, Mexico, Hungary, Poland, Belgium and Albania.
Argyros said to succeed, people must work hard, even if they are not appreciated for the work they do.
“You have to believe in something,” he said. “You have to look at people that are higher than you, hoping that you can reach them.”
Akinlawon said doing undergraduate research with Argyros is one of the core highlights of his story at Cameron.
“I recommend undergraduate research not just for anyone willing to step forward into graduate school,” he said, “but also for anyone who is willing to make the extra effort in whatever field of study.”
According to Akinlawon, Argyros not only taught him how conduct research in mathematics but also how to better apply himself.
“Research with Dr. Argyros has taught me many things over and beyond the world of mathematics,” he said. “His mentorship has definitely trained me to improve on my work ethic.”
Argyros has been working since the age of seven. He said his parents are the ones who taught him the importance of a good work ethic.
“My parents were very hard working,” he said. “My father was in the Greek resistance against the Germans. He was a middle school kid, and at that same time, they closed the schools in Greece.
“He finished third grade and then he became a butcher. … I did not want to work at the butchery because it was a very difficult job, but my character was built there because from seven years old, I was working there.”
Instead of pursuing a career in butchery, Argyros gained inspiration from his middle school math teachers in Greece to pursue mathematical studies.
“I had very, very good teachers,” he said. “They were doing their job right, and they motivated me to move in that area. … In math, you find honesty. I admire it very much.”
Likewise, Akinlawon has a passion for math because he values its consistency and simplicity.
“Know the rules, apply them properly, and you would always reach an answer,” he said.
“Solving or proving something mathematically always brings an inexplicable satisfaction to the student and the teacher alike no matter how many times you do it.”
Argyros’ passion for math has enabled him to succeed academically. He has shared his research at conferences in many countries, including Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, England, Scotland, Romania, Greece, Cyprus, Switzerland, Spain, Mexico, Hungary, Poland, Belgium and Albania.
Argyros said to succeed, people must work hard, even if they are not appreciated for the work they do.
“You have to believe in something,” he said. “You have to look at people that are higher than you, hoping that you can reach them.”

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