Food Bank services community

Supply run: Executive Director for the Lawton Food Bank Jeri Mosiman surveys the food and other supplies that the Lawton Food Bank has stored in their building. The food bank was established in 1985 as a non-profit organization.

Supply run: Executive Director for the Lawton Food Bank Jeri Mosiman surveys the food and other supplies that the Lawton Food Bank has stored in their building. The food bank was established in 1985 as a non-profit organization.

Carson Stringham

Copy Editor

While the coming of the fall and winter seasons generally means a fond look into a future filled with family and holiday cheer, for those who have fallen on hard times, they are a harsh reminder of empty cupboards and dreams that may not come true. This is where the Lawton Food Bank comes in.

The Lawton Food Bank, established in 1985, has become a staple of the Lawton community, providing everything from food to clothes, toys and toiletries for those in need of a helping hand.

A non-profit organization that is independently funded through donations, the Lawton Food Bank has received help from many different groups at Cameron, including clubs and Greek organizations.

Jeri Mosiman, Executive Director for the Lawton Food Bank, said she is thankful for the help the food bank has received from the volunteer efforts of the Cameron community.

“We love the golf team!” Mosiman said. “Whenever there is a bad weather day, Coach Hrnciar brings the team over to help us out. We know that they would like to be out there playing, but we like it when they come and help. Sometimes we hope for bad weather.”

Mosiman also said she appreciates the various athletic teams – baseball, volleyball and men’s and women’s basketball – as well as the Health, Physical Education and Recreation clubs and the various fraternities and sororities who have either donated their time and money or held canned food drives.

“We appreciate the food drives because not only do we need the food, but it helps to raise awareness,” Mosiman said.

Mosiman believes CU PLUS Scholars are a big help because many will volunteer their time between their college classes. She said once a volunteer has learned how the food bank is run, it becomes easier for them to just stop by and lend a hand. All a willing person need do is fill out an agreement form – detailing the rules and regulations of the food bank – and then they are good to go. However, all volunteers must wear closed toe shoes and clean, presentable clothing.

As budget cuts to programs like Oklahoma’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program may be in the near future, Mosiman is worried what these cutbacks might mean for the food bank.

“It is not our intention to anyone’s sole source of food,” she said. “We are just trying to help people out and get them through a hard time. Most people who come to us are just that, they’re circumstantial customers; however, that could change.”

July was a very hard time for the food bank; in that month alone, they provided assistance to over 1,017 families.

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